Michael J Moore, an ON TIME Author Interview

bannerJoin us as we peek behind the scenes of our upcoming anthology, ON TIME. Learn more about Michael J Moore in his featured interview.

 

ABOUT THE STORY

What inspired your story?

Tommy’s an interesting guy. He’s only eight, but I think it’s clear from the first couple paragraphs that this is a kid you might want to keep an eye on as he gets older and capable of hurting people. Since “Popcorn” is so short, I focused on the aspects of his character that show some early warning signs, like indifference to the death of his grandfather, but tried to be subtle by working them into the scenes that were necessary to tell the story. He’s more of an antihero, really, than a protagonist.

Can you tell us a little bit about your protagonist?

Tommy’s an interesting guy. He’s only eight, but I think it’s clear from the first couple paragraphs that this is a kid you might want to keep an eye on as he gets older and capable of hurting people. Since “Popcorn” is so short, I focused on the aspects of his character that show some early warning signs, like indifference to the death of his grandfather, but tried to be subtle by working them into the scenes that were necessary to tell the story. He’s more of an antihero, really, than a protagonist.

What is the most interesting thing about the world you’ve created?

I really enjoyed creating the setting by the river where it’s always cold, it’s always night, and it’s always a tragic Valentine’s Day in the nineteen-fifties.

What genre or mix of genres does your story fit into?

Horror. And I found it quite romantic as well (though Cait respectfully disagrees).

How have your personal experiences influenced this story?

I mean, good writing has to be drawn from experience, right? It’s tricky with speculative fiction, because we’re writing about things that we know aren’t real. I think that becomes a problem for some writers, and that’s why the genres are so heavily saturated with shallow or corny stories. But there are certain elements of what it means to be human that authors should be drawing from in order to add depth and relatability even to a world that’s clearly make believe. I always dig into memories of emotions I’ve experienced, and do my best to share them in my work.

What would you like readers to take away from your story?

Well, I can only hope that they’re still thinking about it for a while after they put it down. That my characters will stick with them, and that they’ll not only be thoroughly entertained, but take the time to actually consider the ambiguity and the implications behind the ending. I want my readers to trust me to give them something to really think about.

What was your favorite part of the story to write and why?

The overall tone. We tend to avoid certain dark places in our minds, and that can be as unhealthy as spending too much time in them. This story was meant to take you to those places, and I think the tone of the narrative alone is able to accomplish that.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michael Moore

When did you write your first story, how old were you, and what was it about?

I was in the forth grade, and it was for a workshop in our school library. The librarian was very impressed, and said I should enter it into some young authors’ competition, but first I should probably omit all the violence and death.

What is your writing survival checklist? (Aka, what helps your write the best: music, snacks, coffee, complete silence, a stress ball, a cat, or an outline, etc.)

Coffee. Silence. Coffee. Solitude. Coffee. Room to pace a few times every hour. More silence. A nap. Coffee.

What has influenced you most as a writer?

As far back as I can remember, my nights were spent alone in the dark, watching old horror movies. My Mother made sure I fell in love with them before I could even read. Then, when I could read, my face could usually be found in a book by either R.L. Stine, Stephen King, or Christopher Pike. I always knew that I was a horror author myself. Sadly, I was twenty-nine-years-old before I decided to explore doing it professionally.

What font do you prefer to write in?

Times New Roman, of course. And is there any size besides 12?

Do you have any writing blogs/vlogs/podcasts, etc. that you would recommend?

The New Panic Room, by HellBound Books LLC.

What is your favorite and least favorite word, and why?

Hm? Well they say fuck is the most diverse word in the English language, and I think the case for it is pretty strong. I’ve always thought Autumn was a pretty word as well, though, isn’t it? Plus, I’m a Halloween nut, and happen to have been born in the fall.

What is the name of your latest book and what inspired it?

A few years ago, I wrote a short story titled, “Highway Nine.” Though I liked the way it came out, the protagonists never got an explanation as to what the monsters were, and where they came from. I wanted closure on the matter. Even if my heroes never got answers, I needed them, so I wrote Highway Twenty to learn more. It’s now been published by Hellbound Books.

 

OnTimeBookCoverKINDLE

Michael J Moore lives in Seattle, Washington. His books include the bestselling post-apocalyptic novel, After the Change and Highway Twenty. His work has appeared in Blood Moon Rising Magazine, Horrorzine Magazine, Schlock Magazine, Minutes Before Six, Terror House Magazine, Siren’s Call Magazine, Hellbound Books anthology Ghosts, Spirits and Specters, has been adapted for theater and produced in the Seattle area, is used as curriculum at the University of Washington and has received an Honorable Mention in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest.  His short stories will also be released this year by Rainfall Books, Horror Tree – Trembling with Fear, Black Petals Horror/Science Fiction Magazine, Transmundane Press and Soteira Press. Follow him at: michaeljmoorewriti.wixsite.com/website or www.facebook.com/michaeljmoorewriting

 

 

ON TIME is coming in Summer 2020. Be sure to follow us on Amazon.

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